Tag Archives: foam roller

Foam Roller: Adductor Relief

The adductor muscles are the muscles that run along your inner thigh. Tight adductor muscles are a common reason why people feel tight in the hips. Tight adductors can inhibit your glutes which can affect compound movements such as squats and lunges. Keeping the adductors loose is very important for hip mobility and to obtain the proper form of lower leg exercises.

To foam roll the adductors, you are going to have to get into an awkward beginning position. But it works.

Read the general instructions on how to foam rolling, here.

Foam Roller: Piriformis Relief

The piriformis muscle is a flat muscle located in the gluteal region near the top of the hip joint. This muscle is important in lower body movement because it stabilizes the hip joint and lifts and rotates the thigh away from the body. This enables us to walk, shift our weight from one foot to another, and maintain balance. It is also used in sports that involve lifting and rotating the thighs.

Tight or irritated piriformis can cause pain and spasms. There are a few different exercises that will help you relieve pain from piriformis, this particular truly works for me.

Also, foam rolling the gluteal area will relieve tension in your lower back ( an area we do not foam rolling). Please, read the general instructions on how to foam rolling, here.

Foam Roller: Shin Relief

Running, jumping rope, box jumps, burpees… they can all lead to shin splints, a painful and incredibly annoying injury experienced by almost every single active person ever. Shin splints are often caused by inflammation of the sheath surrounding the tibia bone. Foam rolling can help release this inflammation (but don’t do this exercise if your shin splints are due to stress fractures).

Read the main instructions on how to foam rolling, here.

Foam roller: Hamstrings Relief

Tight hamstrings are a common issue among all kind of athletes, no matter the sport. Even non-athletes suffer from tight hamstrings, especially professionals who sit for extended periods of time. Foam rolling the hamstrings is an effective solution for this problem.

Stretching may be more beneficial if foam rolling is done prior to the stretch. A study from 2014, Foam Rolling and Static Stretching on Passive Hip Flexion Range of Motion, measures the effects of foam rolling prior to static stretching. The authors found an increase in the hip range of motion after rolling on the hamstring then stretching, compared to stretching alone.

In my experience, tight hamstrings cause lower back pain. Countless times the pain is gone once I take care of my hamstrings. As foam rolling the lower back is something we should NOT do, loosen up your hamstrings is an indirect way to relieve pain and tightness in the lower back area.

Read the main instructions on how to foam rolling, here.

Foam Roller: Calves Relief

You´ll hear/read foam roller is a self-myofascial technique. Ok, self-myofascial release is the term for self-massage to release muscle tightness or trigger points. By applying pressure to specific points muscles return to normal function. Normal function means your muscles are elastic and ready to perform.

Some of the basic, most obvious benefits are better movement and increased range of motion. These benefits can decrease the chance of injury and decrease recovery time after a workout.

We should start foam rolling our calves. From the shoes we wear to the way we sit in a chair, our calves are suffering most of the time.

I would like to introduce a new style of videos, please click play and be amazed how the letters fall from the sky, haha! No, seriously, I would appreciate your feedback.

Read the main instructions on how to foam rolling, here.

Foam Rolling

This month we´re going to learn how to foam rolling. I love my foam roller so much, I´m even worried! Maybe I skip a training session or miss a yoga session, but I always find ten minutes to catch up with my blue friend (you´ll see it´s blue).

As each exercise has its own instructions, but there are main guidelines and usual mistakes common to all of them, I think it´s easier to read separately. Once you know the “rules”, it gets boring read them over and over again, right? Anyway, if you need a reminder or thinking on new followers, I´ll add a link to this post for everyone´s safety.

  1. WARNING! Most important: Do NOT use the foam roller on your lower back. Never. You may get injured. And that´s the opposite you want. Rolling your lower back will cause your spinal muscles to contract to protect your spine. To release your lower back, we roll the muscles that connect to it, glutes, hip flexors, and so on.
  2. Time: Ideally, you should spend 20 seconds or so on each tender spot while managing how much pressure you apply. When using a foam roller you should apply enough pressure so that you feel some tension released, either with constant pressure or by making small movements back and forth. A mild amount of discomfort is expected but you shouldn’t be in pain.
  3. Pressure: Apply enough pressure so that you feel some tension released, either with constant pressure or by making small movements back and forth. A mild amount of discomfort is expected but you shouldn’t be in pain. On painful or inflamed areas, it’s often best to roll just a few inches away first and then use large, sweeping motions to cover the entire area.
  4. Speed: Do not roll too quickly; slow and concentrated movements. If you roll too fast, your muscles won’t have time to adapt and you’re not going to get relief.
  5. Bad posture: If you use an improper form or bad posture while doing this, it could exacerbate existing postural deviations and cause injury. This is why we give specific instructions on each exercise!

Are you ready to foam rolling?