Evernote for fitness. Search Tips.

evernote-for-fitness

Hello, dears!

We´ve seen how to get your data into Evernote but, how do you find your notes when you need them? Evernote provides a set of tools for finding almost anything, easily and on-demand.

If you don´t have a lot of notes, the first and easiest way to find your notes is by clicking on a notebook or tag in the left side panel and visually scan the notes.

search-1

This is probably the least advanced method there is, but that doesn’t mean it’s bad. If you know exactly where you want to go, and have organized your notes effectively, simply going to the notebook or tag that the note is categorized by is a great option. As you add more notes, it becomes increasingly difficult.

Next option is the search box. It´s where all the magic happens.

search-2

It works the same way like a search engine, start typing whatever you’re looking for and Evernote will begin narrowing down the results in real time.

If you click on a notebook or tag first, Evernote will limit the search results to those within that notebook or tag group. Also, the search automatically filters out common words like “a”, “and”, “the”, “these”, as well as others,by default. The default method will only display notes containing every word in your search query, but not necessarily in the same order as they are in the search box.

Every note that you create within Evernote has a lot of properties related to it such as what media attachments are included in the note, how it was uploaded and when it was created.

Below are a few of the search operators you can use to narrow down your search:

tag: this operator can be used to find notes with specific tags.

-tag: will search for notes excluding that specific tag.

any: this operator can be used to make a difference between “and” and “or” when you perform a search with two or more words. For example, if you search for pasta recipes the results will be notes that contain only the words: pasta recipes. However, if you add the any operator before pasta recipes (any: pasta recipes) the results will be notes containing pasta OR recipes.

notebook: this operator will specify the search to a specific notebook.

intitle: this operator will search for the specified words in the titles of your notes.

source: this allows you to search via the source you added the note. source:mobile will show you all notes that were created using Evernote on a mobile application.

created: this allows you to search for notes created over a specific time period. created:20140816, searches for all notes created on August 16, 2014.

updated: Searches for notes updated on or after the date specified. If a note hasn’t been updated since the date it was created, the ‘updated’ date will be the same as the ‘created’ date. updated:20140626, searches for all notes updated on June 26, 2014.

todo: Searches for notes containing one or more checkboxes. todo:true, surfaces all notes that contain a checkbox that is checked. todo:false, surfaces all notes that contain a checkbox that is not checked. todo:*, surfaces notes that contain a checkbox, if it’s checked or not.

encryption: Searches for notes that include text that has been encrypted with Evernote’s built-in encryption system.

latitude: longitude: altitude: Searches for notes that were created at or near the specified coordinates.

Use the + or – to include or exclude certain words. Example: weightloss -diet +exercise  will display all notes with the words weightloss and exercise, but not diet. Note that these also work with other search operators, such as tag.

The asterisk can be put at the end of anything and will give you the results of the search term before it. For instance, if you can remember how to spell an exercise, but remember part of it, type what you can remember and add the * at the end, Evernote will take care of the rest. This is especially helpful in cases where you’re searching for the base word, but want to include other variations of it, like plural forms.

You might already use quotations to get an exact phrase. However, you only need one quotation (“) at the beginning of your phase.

You can combine search operators to improve and narrow results. Using the Boolean techniques in combination with search operators is yet another way to improve results.

Eventually,  you can create a “Saved Search” and re-use it whenever you need it. To do this, just construct the search and select File | New Saved Search. Name your search in the first field (this is solely for your use, so name it whatever you feel will make it easy to recognize). To see your saved search, just clear the search bar and click on it. A list of recent and saved searches will appear.

Hope you enjoy your searching!

 

2 thoughts on “Evernote for fitness. Search Tips.”

I'd love to know what you think about this

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s